• Rabid by Matthew C. Funk

    I met Ryan Bedlam at the wrong end of a bat. I’d had other plans that day in the Spring before the storm. The weather was like good body oil. The sun didn’t have fangs. I’d planned on getting some poboys at the Louisa Mini Mart and hitting Pontchartain beach with my partner, Hakk. Dirty-30 […]

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  • Twenty-Four by Trey R. Barker

    My steel – cool as the falling rain – is jammed right in his face. He pisses himself, an ammonia rain between his legs. “You gonna pull me over, motherfuck?” I say. “The hell you think you are?” His name is Chance. ‘Officer Chance,’ he told me two nights ago. “Wha…I’m not…whoever you’re looking for.” […]

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  • What Did Bagdad Do To Us? by Patti Abbott

    US Army Specialist, Ronnie Bixby, spent 2004 in Bagdad. She’d become a member of the US Army Marksmanship Unit before her rotation began, but never fired her weapon during her entire stint in Iraq. Guarding Halliburton Trucks never drew direct fire on her watch, and she was asleep in her bunk when one of the […]

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  • Big C by Hector Acosta

    I ran away from the cancer about a year ago, when the word chemo first started to be used by the doctors. I’m surprised it took Lola as long as it did to find me, after all, it’s not like I ever went into hiding.  Do you know what the survival rate for stage-four lung […]

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  • Bleed American by John Kenyon

    Foley stomped across the apartment, slammed open the sliding glass door to the deck that was just wide enough to accommodate two lawn chairs, and pulled a tattered American flag from the railing. He came back inside, stepped onto a scarred end table, reached up and unhooked another flag hung sideways with thumbtacks in the […]

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  • What Goes Around by R Thomas Brown

    Davey strolled out of the Texas Electric building into the Texas heat. He flipped up the collar of his salmon polo, and wished his office had jorts day as opposed to jeans Friday. He slipped on his shades, slung his backpack over his left shoulder and headed to the parking garage. “Spare some change?” Davey […]

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  • Stones In Me Pockets by Nigel Bird

    Lefty had planned it like he were military. First target were the police van that’s always there at weekends waiting for the clubs to spill their guts. Turk’s crew went across all casual.  Soon had it over.  Smashed the windscreen and went at the outside like it were a steel drum. Didn’t take long for […]

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  • Roadbeds by Ed Kurtz

    For L.B. Maury was taking a smoke break when the two thugs showed up. They arrived in a black Lincoln and summoned the crew boss from the dusty light of the car’s headlamps. Lucky was bawling out a digger at the time, a Puerto Rican backhoe operator, and Lucky didn’t quit bawling a guy out […]

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  • David Harry Moss Night People by David Harry Moss

    From my bedroom window, on the second floor of a three story building I own at a busy city intersection, I can see the diner. Across the intersection from the diner is a bar that stays open late and across from the bar is a hotel. It is midnight and steady rain is falling. When […]

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  • Map of Scars by Matthew C. Funk

    It started when I found Tyrell on the steps of Carver Desire Baptist. Tyrell was a gangly sixteen. Bookworm mind. Groundhog smile. Proud of nothing but the case of Star Wars figures he used to carry everywhere. He even showed me, his friendly neighborhood Narco detective, a few times. Sad kid. Gang kid. Went by […]

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  • In The Usual Sterile Fashion by Glenn Gray

    Dennis settled in his chair, the scent of cauterized tissue lingering in his nostrils. Stacks of medical texts loomed on the wood desk. One of the texts, a neurosurgical tome, was splayed open at his chest. Beside that, a dictaphone with mini-cassette. He lifted the handset, began dictating the operative report. Surgeon: Dennis Falconcliff, MD […]

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  • Happy Hour at the Schoolfield Diner by Tom Faucett

    A GED, a bastard daughter and an unemployment check from Southern Textiles was all Elias Denton had to show for his 23 years of life. The century old mill shuttered in April, the machinery sold overseas. The laid off weavers and machinists now fought over the same crap jobs at Wal-Mart and Winn Dixie.  Furniture […]

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